Medicare For All The time has come

When Medicare passed Congress in 1965, its authors thought it would be the first step toward universal national health insurance. Medicare is the public health insurance program that covers Americans 65 and older. It’s sponsored by the federal government and paid for with payroll taxes, general revenues, and participant premiums — currently $134 a month for most enrollees. Medicare negotiates with health care providers over prices, to limit costs.

Amy Chesbrough is a registered nurse at the Portland VA Medical Center, a member of American Federation of Government Employees, and a believer in universal health care. On Aug. 23, she and 100 others protested Oregon Congressman Greg Walden for his support of a bill that would have left 22 million more Americans uninsured. But that’s in addition to the 28 million who are still uninsured even under the Affordable Care Act. As the AFL-CIO said in a July 26 statement, “although the ACA has made it possible for many more people to buy comprehensive health plans from insurance companies, it has not guaranteed everyone could afford the health care they need. Instead, many people face steep deductibles, copayments and coinsurance that create overwhelming barriers to care.”

But proposals to expand it to all Americans have fared poorly in Congress. Democratic Congressman John Conyers of Michigan has introduced a “Medicare for All” bill in every session of Congress since 2003, but it has never made it out of committee. When then-Senator Max Baucus (D-Mont.) held a 2009 hearing on the bill that later became the Affordable Care Act (ACA), he barred any discussion of a universal program.

ACA greatly expanded Medicaid (the state-administered federal health insurance program for the poor), and it created state-level exchanges for otherwise uninsured individuals to purchase coverage with the help of income-dependent subsidies and tax credits. But four years after the exchanges opened for business, 28 million Americans are still without health insurance, and premiums continue to rise. In 2017, premiums reached an average of $1,564 a month for employer-sponsored health insurance that covers an employee and family, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Enter Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who called for extending Medicare to all Americans during his 2016 campaign for president. Sanders lost the Democratic primary, but today polls say he’s the most popular politician in America, and his Medicare for All bill has more co-sponsors than ever. When Sanders introduced his Medicare for All bill in 2013, not a single U.S. senator co-sponsored it. Introduced again Sept. 13, his bill had 16 cosponsors. Meanwhile, the House version, introduced once again this year by Conyers, has 120 Congressional cosponsors, up from 62 in 2015.

Polls show 53 to 60 percent of Americans are now in favor of Medicare for All, compared to 23 percent who oppose the idea. The percentage in favor has been steadily increasing for the last 20 years.

Medicare for All is not expected to pass while Republicans control the House and Senate, but it could if Democrats win back Congressional majorities and the White House.

Organized labor, which was instrumental in passing Medicare in the first place, has long supported its expansion into a universal program. More than a dozen international unions and hundreds of local unions and central labor councils have endorsed the concept of Medicare for All. And the national AFL-CIO Executive Council reiterated the labor federation’s support for it in a July 26, 2017, statement: “Our core goal … is to move expeditiously toward a single-payer system, like Medicare for All, that retains a role for workers’ health plans and in which access to quality, affordable health care is indeed a right for everyone in this country.”

The Sanders and Conyers bills don’t say what would happen to union-sponsored multiemployer health trusts that cover more than 10 million union members and their dependents. In Canada, where everyone is covered by public health insurance programs administered at the provincial level, unions negotiate with employers to provide supplemental health benefits.

Unions have fought hard to secure health insurance benefits for members, but the ever-increasing burden of paying for them has become the number one source of conflict with employers. Health insurance also eats up employer resources that could otherwise go to raises or other benefits. Taking health care off the bargaining table could relieve employers of a burden that their foreign competitors don’t have.


MEDICARE FOR ALL CO-SPONSORS IN OREGON

  • U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley
  • U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer
  • U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici
  • U.S. Rep. Peter Defazio

How the Sanders bill would work

  • Lower the Medicare eligibility age, in phases: Year 1 to age 45; Year 2 to 55; Year 3 to 35; Year 4 to everyone
  • Expand Medicare coverage to include dental and vision care
  • End the prohibition on the government using its bargaining power to get better drug prices from pharmaceutical companies

Original Source: https://nwlaborpress.org/2017/10/medicare-for-all-the-time-has-come/

Author: Don McIntosh

October 17, 2017

Medicare Advantage Spends Less on Care, So Why Is It Costing So Much?

The Medicare Advantage program was supposed to save taxpayers money by allowing insurers to offer older Americans private alternatives to Medicare. The plans now cover 19 million people, a third of all those who qualify for Medicare. Enrollee satisfaction is generally high, and studies show that plans offer higher quality than traditional Medicare. But the government pays insurers more than they pay out for patient care — in some years, it turns out, a great deal more.

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Concern about Medicare Advantage’s cost has found sharp expression in a recent suit brought by the Justice Department charging UnitedHealth with excessive billing of the government. While that suit plays out, research published by the National Bureau of Economic Research provides context.

The study, released in January, found that the revenue Medicare Advantage plans received in 2010 exceeded the amount they paid out for medical care by a hefty 30 percent. At more than $2,000 per enrollee per year, that probably topped $20 billion dollars, nearly all from federal payments, not enrollee premiums. The study relied on Medicare Advantage billing data obtained from three large insurers across 36 states, a type of data the government doesn’t yet release.

Paradoxically, even though Medicare Advantage plans cost taxpayers more than traditional Medicare, they spend less on care. In fact, one of the motivations of the program is to capture that lower spending as savings for taxpayers. It hasn’t worked out that way.

“Our study found that health care spending for enrollees in Medicare Advantage plans is 10 to 25 percent lower than for comparable enrollees in traditional Medicare,” said Amy Finkelstein, an M.I.T. economist and one of the study’s authors. “Yet government payments to plans is far above their lower health care costs.” The study was also conducted by four economists at Stanford: Vilsa Curto, Liran Einav, Jonathan Levin and Jay Bhattacharya.

The analysis raises two questions: How do Medicare Advantage plans spend so much less on care? And, given that, how do we account for their higher costs to taxpayers?

One reason for the lower spending is that Medicare Advantage enrollees use less care or use lower-cost care. For example, compared with traditional Medicare patients, Medicare Advantage patients are more likely to go home after a hospital visit, rather than to a skilled nursing facility. Medicare Advantage patients see specialists relatively less often and receive fewer inpatient operations, but more outpatient ones, which are cheaper. All of these are what you’d expect from care management techniques used by Medicare Advantage: referral requirements and narrow networks of doctors, for instance.

Previous studies have also shown that Medicare Advantage enrollees use less of some kinds of care, including hospital care, versus traditional Medicare beneficiaries.

“This is exactly what Medicare Advantage plans were designed to do,” said Dr. Bruce Landon, a physician with Harvard Medical School. “They manage the utilization of services while also assuring that enrollees receive recommended care, all at lower cost to patients.” Dr. Landon’s research on the program found that Medicare Advantage enrollees use 20 percent to 30 percent less emergency department and outpatient surgical care, as well as receive fewer hip and knee replacements.

Medicare Advantage plans also attract enrollees who tend to be healthier than traditional Medicare beneficiaries, a feature that yielded intriguing results in light of the lawsuit against UnitedHealth. When the M.I.T.-Stanford team compared the two kinds of Medicare patients, they found that Medicare Advantage patients were 25 percent less costly than traditional Medicare patients. But when the team more rigorously matched the health of both sets of patients, the Medicare Advantage patients were just 10 percent less costly. This drop does not prove the suit’s claims of overbilling, but it allows for the possibility.

Why does the government pay Medicare Advantage plans so much more than it costs them to cover care? It’s partly an intentional, if controversial, design of the program. Congress has established payment formulas and authorized bonus programs intended to help the private market.

The government also pays insurers for administrative and marketing expenses. Yet even when these additional expenses are factored in, the government still pays plans an excess. According to the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, federal payments to the plans exceeded health care costs and other expenses by 8.5 percent in 2010. Though the Affordable Care Act has reduced payments to plans and limits the amount they can attribute to administration and marketing, they still receive government payments in excess of their costs today.

Not all of the “excess” federal money goes to the insurers’ bottom line. Traditional Medicare entails significant cost sharing for beneficiaries; they are responsible for 20 percent of the costs of doctors visits, for example. Most Medicare Advantage plans don’t require as much cost sharing or out-of-pocket payments. And some of the influence of Medicare Advantage plans’ managed care techniques rub off on the traditional program, too, reducing spending — a spillover effect that partly explains the slowdown in growth of Medicare spending.

But is the cost of Medicare Advantage worth the benefits it delivers? It’s hard to know without knowing more about patients’ diagnoses, services used and other data. The Medicare program had been collecting such data since 2012 and was planning to release it, but, expressing concerns about its quality, recently put off doing so.

Original Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/07/upshot/medicare-advantage-spends-less-on-care-so-why-is-it-costing-so-much.html

Original Author:

Original Date: Aug 7 2017

Read This Before You Take Medicare Benefits

Medicare Supplemental Insurance Chart

Most Americans are eligible for Medicare benefits beginning in the month of their 65th birthday. Although it is the most widely used health insurance plan in the United States, many pre-retirees don’t understand it well. With that in mind, if you’re getting close to turning 65, here’s some basic information about Medicare that you need to know.

The four “parts” of Medicare

There are four different types of Medicare insurance, known as “parts,” designated with letters A through D. Here’s the difference between each one:

  • Medicare Part A is hospital insurance, and covers expenses such as hospital stays and services provided by skilled nursing facilities. (We’ll discuss what Medicare covers in greater depth later on.)
  • Medicare Part B is medical insurance, and this is the part of Medicare you’ll use when you see your doctor or obtain preventative care.

Collectively, Medicare Parts A and B are known as “original Medicare.” These are the parts that nearly all senior citizens have.

  • Medicare Part C is Medicare Advantage, which are plans offered through private insurance companies that are contracted to provide Parts A and B benefits.
  • Medicare Part D is prescription-drug coverage, which can be added on to Medicare coverage. Part D plans are offered through private insurance companies and can be part of a Medicare Advantage plan.

Image Source: Getty Images.

Do you need to sign up for Medicare at 65?

If you’re already collecting Social Security benefits, you will automatically be enrolled in Medicare, starting on the first day of the month in which you turn 65.

If you’re not collecting Social Security benefits, you’ll need to apply for Medicare. You can apply for Medicare only at the Social Security Administration’s website, and your initial enrollment period runs for seven months, beginning three months before the month of your 65th birthday.

There’s a possible exception if you’re covered under an employer’s health plan (not through COBRA or retiree coverage). If your employer has 20 or more employees, it meets the definition of “group coverage” and you don’t need to enroll in Medicare during your initial enrollment period. Instead, you’ll get a special enrollment period when you leave your job or your group coverage ends.

Having said that, it’s still a good idea to sign up for Medicare Part A at 65. It’s free, so there’s really no reason not to. On the other hand, Medicare Part B has a monthly premium you’ll have to pay, so it can be smart to wait if you aren’t required to sign up during your initial enrollment period.

How much does Medicare cost?

Cost of Medicare Supplemental Insurance

For most retirees, Medicare Part A is free, meaning you probably won’t have to pay a premium for your hospital insurance.

Medicare Part B, medical insurance, is another story. The standard Medicare Part B premium is $134 per month in 2017, although beneficiaries who pay their premiums directly through their Social Security benefits pay slightly less, because of cost-of-living adjustment rules.

In addition, high-income retirees pay higher premiums. This is based on the beneficiary’s income from two years ago, so 2015 income was considered for 2017 Medicare Part B premiums. Single taxpayers with adjusted gross income greater than $85,000 and married couples with combined incomes over $170,000 pay Part B premiums of $187.50 to $428.60 per month, depending on their specific income level.

Finally, Medicare advantage and prescription-drug plans have costs that vary widely, depending on variables such as location and scope of coverage.

What original Medicare does (and does not) cover

As I mentioned, “original Medicare” refers to parts A and B. Since virtually all Americans over 65 will have original Medicare, it’s important to know what it covers, and what you’ll still be responsible for paying.

First, of all, Medicare Part A covers hospital service, including meals, drugs, and other services while hospitalized. It also covers skilled nursing facilities for a limited amount of time, nursing home care that is deemed medically necessary, hospice care, and some home health services.

In addition to doctors’ office visits, Medicare Part B covers outpatient surgeries, as well as necessary medical supplies, such as wheelchairs and walkers. It also pays for preventative services such as lab tests, disease screenings, and disease-preventing services, such as an annual flu shot.

However, there are some medical costs that Medicare doesn’t cover, such as:

  • Long-term care.
  • Dental care (for the most part).
  • Eye care.
  • Acupuncture.
  • Hearing aids.

In addition to this list, it’s important to point out that you’ll have some out-of-pocket costs for covered services as well. For starters, Medicare Part A has a $1,316 deductible per benefit period for inpatient hospital stays, and a coinsurance requirement of at least $329 per day for stays longer than 60 days. Skilled nursing facility stays are only fully covered for 20 days, and you’ll pay a $164.50 daily coinsurance payment for longer stays, up to 100 days, at which point Medicare stops paying.

Part B has a lower $183 annual deductible, but after this is met, Medicare generally covers 80% of covered services, leaving you responsible for the other 20%.

How to protect yourself from unexpected costs

medicare-money

These copays, deductibles, and coinsurance requirements are collectively referred to as “Medigaps.” To limit your unexpected healthcare costs, a Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plan, or Medigap plan, can be purchased.

There are 10 different types of Medigap plans, and price and availability depend on your location. You can read the features of all 10 plans at Medicare’s website, but an important point is that Plan F is the most comprehensive, as well as the most popular. While it’s a bit more expensive than other Medigap plans (average monthly cost of $159-$239 for a 65-year-old male), it covers virtually every copay, deductible, or coinsurance payment Medicare Parts A and B could ask you to pay.

The bottom line is that by knowing the basics of Medicare, you’ll know when and how to sign up, how much you’ll pay for it, how much of your costs Medicare will cover, and how to protect yourself from uncertainty.

The $16,122 Social Security bonus most retirees completely overlook

If you’re like most Americans, you’re a few years (or more) behind on your retirement savings. But a handful of little-known “Social Security secrets” could help ensure a boost in your retirement income. For example: one easy trick could pay you as much as $16,122 more… each year! Once you learn how to maximize your Social Security benefits, we think you could retire confidently with the peace of mind we’re all after. Simply click here to discover how to learn more about these strategies.

Original Source: http://host.madison.com/business/investment/markets-and-stocks/read-this-before-you-take-medicare-benefits/article_69d1b2fb-05f7-524f-bdb4-c82b4d4c11b5.html

Original Author: Mathew Frankel

Original Date: Jul 31 2017

Introduction to Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans

While Medicare pays for many healthcare services, there are still many that are not covered. Traditional, or Original Medicare, does not provide full coverage for medical expenses.  Some expenses such as deductibles, copayments, and co-insurance amounts are not covered under Original Medicare, Medicare Part A and Part B.  In order to offset these expenses Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans were designed.

What is Medicare Supplemental Insurance and How Does It Work?

Supplemental Insurance is an additional health care plan that is provided by private insurance companies to cover the gaps left in Medicare Part A and Part B.  Federal and State laws regulate Medicare Supplemental Plans to protect you as the beneficiary.  Plans are clearly labeled as Medicare Supplemental Insurance and the policies are standardized.  Supplemental Insurance Plans are all the same and do not vary from state to state.  The only aspect that that changes is the cost and where it is purchased.

Medicare Supplemental Insurance Eligibility Requirements

Supplemental coverage works only in conjunction with Medicare Part A and Part B.  The acceptance of your application is guaranteed if you are 65 or older and apply within six months of the initial enrollment in Medicare Part B.  Under certain circumstances, pre-existing conditions are waived; specific details can be found by working with a Medicare Supplemental Insurance Broker.  A  Medicare policy covers only one person.  Your spouse must have a policy of their own.

Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans

Participants may select from up to ten standardized policies, Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans A through Plan N.  Each plan offers a different set of primary benefits with a unique set of benefits. These policies are the same no matter what private insurance company you choose to purchase the insurance from.  Each insurance company can decide which policies they want to sell and set their own prices so research carefully to avoid overpaying.

Medicare Supplemental Plans A through J

Plans A through J have more benefits, higher premiums, and lower out of pocket expenses.  Basic benefits include coverage of Medicare Part A and Part B copayments, co-insurance, and three pints of blood.  Extra benefits may include Skilled Nursing Facility co-insurance, foreign travel emergency services, at-home recovery and preventative care.

Medicare Supplemental Plans K through M

Plans K through M have lower premiums and higher out of pocket expenses.  Basic benefits include Medicare Part A hospital benefits, Medicare Part A and B coinsurance or co-pay, three pints of blood and hospice care.  Extra benefits include skilled nursing facilities coinsurance and Medicare Part A deductibles.

Medicare Supplemental Plan N provides co-insurance payments on hospital expenses for Medicare Part A, as well as a full year of payments once your Medicare benefits have been depleted.  Supplemental Plan N policies pay 100% of Medicare Part B co-insurance.  Doctor visits cost up to twenty dollars and emergency room visits up to fifty dollars.

When selecting a Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plan, carefully compare each plan and compare quotes from insurers. Make sure you choose the coverage that best meets your needs and be sure not to pay more for the benefits than you need to.

Learn more about Medicare Supplemental Insurance plans, rates and more at http://www.emedicare-supplemental-insurance.com.  Medicare Supplemental Insurance brokers will help you compare Medicare Supplemental Insurance rates and plans.  To talk to an expert in Medicare coverage toll free 888.404.5049 today!

BlueCross Medicare Advantage Quality Rewards Program Recognizes Primary Care Physicians For Superior Patient Care Outcomes

BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee’s Medicare Advantage Quality Rewards Program recognized primary care physicians across the state for achieving exceptional patient care outcomes.

The program promotes improvement in quality and recognizes physicians for demonstrating an increase in quality measures over time. These health measures include preventive care, patient adherence with certain medications for treatment of chronic diseases and treatment support in specific areas, where a strong focus could lead to improvements in patient health.

“A review of the BlueCross Medicare Advantage STARS 2016 quality data shows that the following providers are excelling in caring for BlueCross Medicare Advantage plan members with outstanding supportive treatment and appropriate preventive care,” officials said.

The following 52 providers earned a 5 out of 5 Star rating. An additional 539 physicians received a 4 or 4.5 Star rating.

•           Indumeet B. Bal – Nashville
•           Ayrika L. Bell – Brentwood
•           Emily S. Burnham – Blue Ridge
•           Bradford L. Mitchell – Chattanooga
•           Nageswara R. Chunduru – Murfreesboro
•           Vivian M. Clark – Elizabethton
•           Michelle L. Davenport – Elizabethton
•           Wayne E. Moore – Mount Juliet
•           Jonathan T. English – Memphis
•           William A. Garrett Jr. – Johnson City
•           David P. Guthrie – Dyersburg
•           Anna K. Hopla – Martin
•           Jon C. Huebschman – East Ridge
•           Christopher E. Ingraham – Murfreesboro
•           Christopher D. Marshall – Parsons
•           William L. Martin II – Rutledge
•           Vicente Ortiz – Meadowview
•           Gibran B. Naddy – Columbia
•           Donald E. Robinson – Cleveland
•           Elaina D. Rodela – Cleveland
•           John D. Rudd – Smyrna
•           Pamela J. Sanders – Cookeville
•           Phillip A. Sherman – Union City
•           Wayne J. Stuart – Seymour
•           Amanda T. Moore Miller – Knoxville
•           Mark T. Weaver – Knoxville
•           Kayleigh M. Liton – Knoxville
•           James R. Landon – Knoxville
•           David J. Wasserman – Knoxville
•           Michael N. Wolff – Knoxville
•           Byron S. Cooke – Knoxville
•           Priyanka M. Gaikwad – Knoxville
•           Connie S. Nickelson – Knoxville
•           Kevin S. Toppenburg – Knoxville
•           Ahmad H. Altabbaa – Knoxville
•           Sung Yong Bae – Knoxville
•           Richard R. McBride – Knoxville
•           Steven J. Thompson – Knoxville
•           Phillippe Leveille – Knoxville
•           Phillip F. Mayette – Knoxville
•           Antonio L. Betanzos – Knoxville
•           Larry W. Cooke Jr. – Knoxville
•           Kendra L. Flowers – Knoxville
•           Niva Misra – Knoxville
•           Ernest Wong – Knoxville
•           Brandon W. Lancaster – Knoxville
•           Bimaje O. Akpa – Knoxville
•           Moses A. Swaucy – Murfreesboro
•           Stephanie J. Anderson – Memphis
•           Charles R. Tessier IV – Murfreesboro
•           Marcia D. Toppenberg – Greenville
•           James C. Wallwork – Columbia

“We are pleased to recognize these top performing Tennessee physicians, along with many other providers who are committed to giving their patients the highest quality care every day,” said Dr. J.B. Sobel, vice president and chief medical officer of Senior Products at BlueCross. “We are proud to partner with these doctors who remain focused on improving their patients’ health and their quality of life.”

For a full list of Tennessee providers participating in the Quality Incentive Program, visit bcbst.com.

Original Source: http://www.chattanoogan.com/2017/5/31/349030/BlueCross-Medicare-Advantage-Quality.aspx

Original Date: May 31, 2017

Comparing Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans 2017

There are ten Medicare supplemental insurance plans that are available in almost all of the states. The policies are formulated in a little different way in Minnesota, Massachusetts, and Wisconsin. The names of the plans are after the alphabet like A, B, C, and so on. There are total ten plans and the first letters of the alphabet are used to represent them.

Medicare Part A: This part deals with hospital costs and the coinsurance. For the first sixty days of the hospital stay, all of the cost is paid by Medicare. It deducts $329/ day from the 61st day till the 90th day. The cost is fully paid from 90th day till 151st day, except for the deduction of $658 every day.

Medicare supplemental insurance plans A, B, C, D, F, G, K, L, M, and N pay for these set of costs.

Medicare Part B: This part deals with medically necessary doctors’ services. 80% of the costs of are paid for by Medicare. The remaining 20% is covered by optional supplemental insurance plans. Medicare Supplement Plan L pays for 75% of the costs of Medicare Part B while Plan K pays 50%. All of the other plans such as plan A, B, C, D,  F, G, M, N pay 100% of the cost in Part B.

1st three pints of Blood: All Medicare Supplement plans pay the cost of the first three pints of blood extra blood is covered by Plan K at 50% of the cost whereas Plan L covers 75%. The rest of the supplemental plans cover 100% of the cost benefit.

Part A: Coinsurance of Hospice Care: All supplemental insurance plans pay some part or all of the cost involved with hospice care. With all remaining plans hospice charges are paid by Medicare.  Plan K covers 50% and Plan L covers 75% of the costs. The rest of supplemental plans cover 100% of these cost provision.

Coinsurance of Nursing Facility: The nursing staff is directly related to the provision of the basic facilities and procedures to the patients including intravenous injections, intramuscular injections, and the physiotherapy. Medicare pays the cost of the skilled nursing facility for the first twenty days. From the 21st till 100th day, all the cost is provided except for $165 per day. The Medicare doesn’t pay beyond the 100th day of attainment of this facility. Plan A and Plan B do not provide the benefits of these services. The rest of the supplemental plans cover this aspect of nursing facilities to 100% as mentioned in the description.

Deductible (Medicare Part A): There is a deductible from the hospital stay. The amount as per the 2017 criteria is $1,316 dollars per stay.  This is covered at 50% with Plan K and Plan M and 75% with Plan L.  All other supplemental insurance plans are fully contributing their part in this aspect.

Deductible (Medicare Part B): This is the yearly amount that must be paid before any benefits of Part B such as doctor visits, treatment facilities, and other outpatient services. For the year 2017, the deductible amount is $183. Plan C and Plan F pay for the cost of this deductible.

Excess Chargers in part B: The excess charges include that amount which a health care professional charges above the amount set by the Medicare are covered by Plans G and Plan F by providing coverage for those excess charges.

Emergency Foreign Travel: This isn’t covered by Medicare and participants need to enroll in one of the plans C, D, F, G, M and N which cover 100% of this benefit.  A maximum sum of $50,000 dollars, 80% benefit is provided with a deductible of $250.

By comparing Medicare supplemental plans, the benefits they provide, and differences in each, you can purchase the plan that best suits your health care needs. Medicare supplemental plans can be bought from the private insurance companies.  These companies can sell Medicare supplement insurance plans in almost all of the states and offer the exact same policy.

Learn more about Medicare Supplemental Insurance plans, rates and more at http://www.emedicare-supplemental-insurance.com.  Medicare Supplemental Insurance brokers will help you compare Medicare Supplemental Insurance rates and plans.  To talk to an expert in Medicare coverage toll free 888.404.5049 today!

Arizona Medicare Supplemental Insurance Plans

All American citizens who are eligible for Medicare are encouraged to enroll in Medicare supplemental insurance plans as these policies are designed to benefit them. Most beneficiaries are reaping the benefits of their investments. Do you live in Arizona? Have you signed up for Medicare supplemental insurance coverage in Arizona? Are you clueless on where to start? Well don’t stress any longer you have come to the right place, at the right time.

Here are vital details about Medicare Supplement Plans in Arizona:

Medicare supplemental insurance policies do not vary from state to state across the United States. Beneficiaries are encouraged to take Medicare coverage for their own benefits. Medicare coverage may cover copayments, hospice care, deductibles, and coinsurance. Arizona Medicare supplement insurance plans are designed to favor beneficiaries who wish to add extra coverage to their existing Medicare Part A and B coverage. It is worth mentioning that only beneficiaries with Original Medicare coverage can purchase Medicare supplemental insurance plans in Arizona.

Interested beneficiaries have the privilege of choosing a Medicare supplement plan that suits them from a wide variety of plans available in Arizona. All Medicare supplemental insurance policies in Arizona are classified by a standardized letter. The most commonly chosen plan in Arizona is Medigap Plan F. Medicare supplement insurance providers in Arizona are required to offer standardized benefits to their beneficiaries.  This means no matter who you buy Medicare supplement plan F from the coverage is exactly the same.

Medicare supplement insurance in Arizona varies in price depending on the company the insurance is purchased through. They also don’t cover additional health care such as dental, vision and hearing. However, Medicare supplement plans in Arizona may include coverage while traveling abroad.

Interested beneficiaries are required to sign up for Medicare supplement insurance within the stipulated six months during the Medigap open enrollment period in Arizona or upon initially receiving benefits. This enrollment period commences immediately you have celebrated your 65th birthday. The general requirement is that you are signed up for Medicare Part B. Insurance companies in Arizona are prohibited from denying coverage or even charging higher premium rates to beneficiaries during the six month Medigap open enrollment period. This rule is made possible by the pre-existing medical conditions agreement. Unfortunately beneficiaries who enroll in various Medicare supplemental insurance in Arizona after this period has expired are not protected from paying substantial monthly premiums and fees for late enrollment.

Medicare supplement policies in Arizona that fall under the same lettered plan may have varying costs for the exact same coverage.  Remember coverage for Medigap PlanF is the same no matter where it is purchased from.  For this, it is prudent for beneficiaries to make their choices carefully. If you are eligible for Medicare, it is recommended that you enroll for a Medicare supplemental insurance that meets all your health care and budge needs.

Learn more about Arizona Medicare Supplemental Insurance plans, rates and more at www.emedicare-supplemental-insurance.com/arizona-medicare-supplement-plans.  Our Arizona Medicare Supplemental Insurance brokers will help you compare Medicare Supplemental Insurance rates and plans in Arizona.  To talk to an expert in Arizona Medicare coverage toll free 888.404.5049 today!